Suicide Project

THE LCR2 PROJECT

The Center for Health Ethics Law and Development (CHELD) has commenced a four tier anti-suicide project called LCR2 under its Mental Health Programme.  We are primarily advocate for the reform of the law against attempted suicide in Nigeria.  In almost all of Nigeria, attempted suicide is a crime under the Criminal Code and Penal Code and carries a penalty of 1 year in imprisonment.

Apart from our advocacy for reform of the law on attempted suicide in Nigeria, through our LCR2 project, we provide:

  • free legal representation to persons charged with attempted suicide to ensure their discharge and acquittal.
  • Counselling, referrals and rehabilitation
  • Re-integration into the society. through skill acquisition and employment opportunities where necessary. We also fund periodic medical check-ups and carry out several follow up visits.

 

The LCR2 program is tailor-made for persons in Lagos State and environs. However, our confidential helplines are open to any suicidal person and their families who may need support, counselling and guidance. Our trained staff are always available to support anyone who is impacted directly or indirectly.

Please contact us on 09058433371, 09058433371 (Call, SMS and whatsapp) or on social media:

Center for Health Ethics Law and Development @CHELD.NG  @CHELDNG

or via our website: www.cheld.org

The following helplines are also available to support suicide prevention programs across Nigeria:

  • National Depression/Suicide Prevention Initiative (NSPI)
    08062106493, 08092106493, 09080217555.
  • Mental health Desk office, Lagos State Ministry of Health
    0708342870, 09095634919
  • Suicide Research and Prevention Initiative (SURPIN), Lagos State University Teaching Hospital
    0806 210 6493, 0809 210 6493
  • Lagos State help lines for Suicide Prevention
    08058820777, 09030000741
  • Lagos Emergency Service
    767, 112

 

If you have ever contemplated suicide or have a loved one who attempted suicide or died has died as a result of suicide, you are not alone.

 

Brief Background

The issue of suicide has become one of serious public concern. It is no longer an issue to be dealt with privately or discussed behind closed doors. Its reach is so extensive that it affects people of every race, ethnicity and socio-economic class, all genders and age groups. Sadly, the 2016 World Health  Organization (WHO) Statistics data visualizations dashboard places Nigeria as the 30th most suicidal country in the World and the 5th in Africa. According to the data, 9.5 per 100,000 people attempt suicide. In the year 2018, reports of suicide and suicide attempts on the media has been on a very high rise.  It is unclear if the scary statistics is an indication that the rate of suicide in Nigeria is on the rise, or if the reporting of suicide cases has drastically increased with the help of social media. What is certain is that the issue of suicide is a matter for social support and public health and it requires urgent attention. Ingestion of pesticide, drug overdose, hanging, drowning and firearms are among the most common methods of suicide globally. In Nigeria, most suicides are committed by ingestion of pesticides and drowning.

 

If you have ever contemplated suicide or have a loved one who attempted suicide or died has died as a result of suicide, you are not alone. The issue of suicide has become one of serious public concern. It is no longer an issue to be dealt with privately or discussed behind closed doors. Its reach is so extensive that it affects people of every race, ethnicity and socio-economic class, all genders and age groups. Sadly, the 2016 World Health  Organization (WHO) Statistics data visualizations dashboard places Nigeria as the 30th most suicidal country in the World and the 5th in Africa. According to the data, 9.5 per 100,000 people attempt suicide. In the year 2018, reports of suicide and suicide attempts on the media has been on a very high rise.  It is unclear if the scary statistics is an indication that the rate of suicide in Nigeria is on the rise, or if the reporting of suicide cases has drastically increased with the help of social media. What is certain is that the issue of suicide is a matter for social support and public health and it requires urgent attention. Ingestion of pesticide, drug overdose, hanging, drowning and firearms are among the most common methods of suicide globally. In Nigeria, most suicides are committed by ingestion of pesticides and drowning.

While many cases of suicide can be linked to mental disorders, it is a well-established fact that the decision to kill one’s self can also be impulsive and has been severally linked to a person’s  inability to deal with life’s challenges such as financial crisis, heart break, chronic or terminal illness, physical abuse, loss of a loved one etc. While suicide puts an end to the pain a person suffers, it puts loved ones in a state of shame, grief, guilt for not preventing the suicide, a feeling of failure because the person they loved felt unloved or unappreciated enough to commit suicide, distress over unresolved issues and prolonged sadness. Multiple research has shown suicide affects the mental health of loved ones and that the children of suicidal parents are at increased risk of suicide themselves.

The stigma surrounding the topic of suicide, culture of silence and the criminalization of attempted suicide are the three strongest impediments to the control of suicide rates in Nigeria. People who attempt suicide in Nigeria are made to face criminal trials after which they are convicted and incarcerated. This comes with a lot of the public humiliation, causes pain to family members, as well as the stigma of being an ex-convict which follows the victim for a life time. The reason for imposing penal consequences usually attached to prohibited acts is to curb the commission of such acts. However in the case of suicide, the reverse is the case. Imprisonment has never been proved to deter suicide. Multiple research shows that suicidal persons who do not get urgent intervention continue to attempt to kill themselves until they eventually succeed. A 2018 WHO study shows that suicide rates tend to decline after decriminalization. Hence, many countries around the world have decriminalized attempted suicide.

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